Handling With Your Newborn Baby And Physical Play

Handling With Your Newborn Baby And Physical Play

Handling With Your Newborn Baby And Physical Play

From an early age, your baby needs closeness and comfort as well as food, warmth, and sleep. To begin with, you will probably feel quite nervous about handling and cuddle him, your hands seem so clumsy, his limbs so floppy, his head and neck so fragile. Your normal, care full handling won’t hurt him, even the soft fontanelle on the top of his head has a tough membrane to protect it. But you may startle him if you pick him up suddenly, making him fling his limbs out, or frighten him if he thinks he will fall. It won’t be long before you are both much more confident in each other. As your baby gains control over his muscles, he may enjoy some boisterous games, at four or five months he may love to be swung up above your head, or perched high on your shoulders. If he’s timid and some babies have handled him gently until he is more outgoing. Respond to your baby’s moods, and let him set the pace of your physical play.

Picking Up and Putting Down A Newborn Baby :

Talk to your baby as you transfer her from one position to another, your voice is familiar and reassuring. Remember that until she is about eight weeks old she cannot control her head or muscles. You need to support her body all the time so that her head does not flop or her limbs dangle.

Picking Your Baby Up:

1: When your baby is lying on her back, slide one hand under her lower back and bottom.

2: Slide your other hand under her neck and head, going in from the opposite side.

3: Lift her gently and slowly, so that her body is supported and her head can’t roll back.

4: Carefully transfer her head to the crook of your elbow or your shoulder, so it is supported.

Putting Your Baby Down:

1: Put one hand underneath her head and neck, then hold her under the bottom with the other. Lower her slowly, gently supporting her until the mat or mattress is taking her weight.

2: Slide your nearest hand out from under her bottom. Use this hand to lift head a little so you can slide out your other hand, and lower her head down gently. Don’t let her head fall back on to the surface, or jerk your arm out quickly.

Cradling your newborn baby in your arms:

  • Your baby will feel secure cradled in the crook of your elbow, her head and limbs well supported.

Holding your newborn baby face down:

  • Your baby may like being held face down in your arms, her chin and cheek resting on your forearm.

Holding your newborn baby against your shoulder:

  • Held upright like this, your baby feels secure. Take her weight with one hand on her bottom, and support her head with the other hand.

Picking Your Baby Up:

1: To pick your baby up from her side, slide one hand under her neck and head, the other beneath her bottom.

2: Scoop Your baby into your arms, making sure her head doesn’t flop. Lift her slowly and gently.

3: Hold her against your body, then slide your forearm under her head.

4: Now her head is supported in your elbow, and she feels secure.

Putting Your Baby Down On Her Back:

1: When you put your baby down to sleep, lower her to the mattress, keeping her nestled in your arms and her head supported in your elbow.

2: Once she is on the mattress, slide out the hand under her bottom.

3: Lift her head to slide your arm out and lower her gently on to her back.

Picking Your Baby Up from Her Front:

1: When your baby is lying on her stomach, slide one hand under her chest so you forearm will support her chin when you lift, the other under her bottom.

2: Lift her slowly, turning her toward you. Bring her up to your body and slide the arms supporting her head forward until her head nestles comfortably in the crook of your elbow. Put your other hand under her bottom and legs, so she is cradled and secure.

Using A Sling:

  • A sling is an excellent way of carrying your baby around in the first three months, the contact with your body and the motion as you walk will soothe her, and it leaves your arms free. It’s not difficult to put the sling on when there’s no one to help you take it off using the same method in reverse.

Putting A Sling On:

1: Clip the sling on around your waist, if you find it awkward, clip it in front and swivel it around.

2: Pick your baby up and hold her against your shoulder, your hand behind her head.

3: Sit down on a chair and lean back, so that the weight of your baby’s body is supported on your chest and stomach. Pull the pouch up and maneuver her legs through the holes, always pulling the sling and not your baby’s legs.

4: Pull the shoulders straps up and over your shoulders, using one hand to take your baby’s weight all the time.

5: As you sit forwards the sling will gradually take her weight.

Wearing The Sling:

  • Always put a hand behind your baby’s head when you lean forward, the support won’t be adequate for her heavy head.

Handling and Physical Play:

Let Her Face For Wards:

  • Your alert three-month-old has a good view of the world facing forwards. Put one hand between her legs, the other around her chest. She doesn’t need you to support her head anymore.

Play Bouncing Games On Your Lap:

  • up and down by your knees, in time to a favorite rhythm. Hold his arms in case he jerks backward.

Sit Her Astride Your Hip:

  • Your three-month-old can adjust her own position if she’s uncomfortable and will cling to you when she needs extra security.

Sit Him On Your Shoulder:

  • Sit your six-month-old on your shoulder so he’s taller than you are, he will be exhilarated from this new perspective.

Eye-to-Eye Contact:

  • Your baby will love you to swing her up high. Your face is always the best entertainment of all.

Winding Down:

  • However boisterously you play with your baby, have a few minutes of gentle, quiet cuddles afterward. Always take your cue from your baby, and forget the roughhousing for today if he’s not responding with his usual giggles of pleasure.

 

Categories
Tags